CANCELLED – EDUC 108 – Educational Psychology and Classroom Management

EDUC 108 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management

Session 2: July 7 – August 12

The Education 108 online summer course scheduled for July 7 – August 12, 2020 has been cancelled.

Course Description

Students will gain an understanding of the physical, social, emotional, speech and language, and intellectual development of children and the ability to use this understanding in guiding learning.

Topics include the teacher’s role in motivation, emotional development of learners, and an analysis of the teaching-learning situation including the dynamics of interaction, classroom management, guidance, and instruction preK-12.

Course Overview

Study of research findings relevant to the learner in the classroom with emphasis on factors that influence learning. Topics include the teacher’s role in motivation, emotional development of learners, analysis of the teaching-learning situation including the dynamics of interaction, classroom management, guidance, and instruction preK-12. Students will construct an accurate understanding of the principles of educational psychology by understanding the nature of learning, by relating the principles to their own prior knowledge and behavior to the learning and behavior of adolescents. Classroom management techniques are studied.

Course Objectives

  1. Understand, and apply research knowledge to teaching, the physical, social, emotional, speech and language, and intellectual development of children and the ability to use this understanding in guiding learning experiences and relating meaningfully to students. (CAEP 1.1, InTASC 1 d,e,f,g )
  2. Identify and explain classroom and behavior management techniques, classroom community building, and individual interventions, including techniques that promote emotional well-being and teach and maintain behavioral conduct and skills consistent with norms, standards, and rules of the educational environment. (CAEP 1.1, InTASC 3 I,j,k,l,m)
  3. Identify and explain effective diverse classroom approaches based upon behavioral, cognitive, affective, social and ecological theory and practice. (CAEP 1.1, InTASC 2 g,h,I,j,k)
  4. Explore ways children and adolescents learn and think. (CAEP 1.1, InTASC 3 i )
  5. Demonstrate how development has innumerable implications for classroom instruction. (CAEP 1.1, InTASC 3 j, k, m, 7 i)
  6. Summarize the role of education by focusing on knowledge of teaching, the cognitive development of students, the purpose of school, and the teacher’s role. (CAEP 1.1, InTASC 7 i )
  7. Write analytically and thoughtfully in responding, summarizing, or synthesizing information.
  8. Apply knowledge of National and Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) to classroom instruction. (CAEP 1.4, InTASC 6 j,n,p )
  9. Express an understanding of the role of education by focusing on knowledge of teaching, the cognitive development of students, the purpose of school, and the teacher’s role

Course Materials

Textbook: Teach Like Your Hair Is On Fire. Esquith, R. (2007).
Textbook: “Having of Wonderful Ideas” and other essays on teaching and learning. Duckworth, E. (2006).
Textbook: Mindset: The new psychology of success. Dweck, C. (2016). Teacher’s College Press.

Syllabus (PDF)

Dates: Cancelled

Department: Education

Course:  EDUC 108

Credit Hours:  3

Prerequisites:

none

Satisfies:

SS;IIC
The above requirements are from the Randolph College general education program.  Check with your home institution to see if this course fulfills your requirements.

Tuition & Fees:

$1,350 tuition

Textbooks and other course materials can be purchased separately from the source of your choosing.

Your Instructor

Peggy Schimmoeller

Peggy SchimmoellerProfessor of Education, Director of the Randolph College Master of Arts in Teaching program
B.S., University of Dayton; M.A.T., Oakland University; Ed.D., University of Virginia

I am a teacher educator and educational researcher interested in a wide range of topics related to the learning process. All children are learners and I adhere to this premise in all of the work. I received my B.S. from the University of Dayton, my master’s degree from Oakland University, and my Doctorate of Education from the University of Virginia. My areas of emphasis include special education, educational law, math and science education and teaching and learning through the college level. I joined the Randolph College community in 1993.

As an educator I have taught in Ohio, New York, Michigan and Virginia. I was drawn to students who were intelligent but performed behind their peer group in school. As a result of these experienced I pursued a master’s degree focusing on reading and learning abilities and disabilities. My doctoral studies included work in curriculum and instruction, leadership and policy studies and child development/psychology. I have worked with pre-K through high school aged students who were diagnose with mild or moderate reading and learning disabilities in a wide range of setting at both private and public schools.

My research work includes work in Bangkok, Thailand and Lahore, Pakistan where I have traveled and worked with teachers in public schools and colleges. I research how teaching and instructional practices influence student learning and classroom climate. My work includes reading, science, mathematics and college teaching practices.

During my tenure at Randolph I have worked to promote higher education and the importance of the liberal arts and its practical application to various professional career opportunities. I enjoy working with colleagues on leadership, change and transition, and strategies that help move the college forward.

I am actively involved in a variety of professional organizations including the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, the American Education Research Association, Virginia Association for Science and Technology, and the American Association for University Women. In addition I work closely with the Jubilee Family Development Center, New Vistas Schools, and Camp Kum-Ba- Yah Environmental Center to promote learning outside of the traditional school day.

Register for Summer Session